Statue Of Abraham Lincoln Destroyed, Vandalized In Illinois

The debate over Confederate monuments has resurfaced. Some folks are skipping the debate part entirely and just taking matters into their own hands.

We’ve seen all kinds of footage of mob mentality running amok, as scores of protesters have taken it upon themselves to destroy specific monuments.

That behavior has been met with shrugs by the press, as has been the defacing of other monuments.

Take this disturbing incident, for example.

As DNA Info shares, a 3-foot-tall statue of Abraham Lincoln “was found vandalized [burned and sprayed with graffiti] on Wednesday” in Englewood, Illinois.

Apparently, said protesters missed the part of history where Lincoln actually opposed the Confederacy and freed slaves.

Ald. Raymond Lopez (15th) is among the many that are outraged, as he noted that “this disgusting act sends a horrible message to West Englewood.”

That it does, Ald. Lopez. We’ll add the other disturbing incidents we’ve seen to the list as well, as they all send an absolutely horrible message to the nation as a whole.

Should there be some honest and open dialogue about certain monuments and their symbolism in affected communities? Sure, and there’s few grounded folks that would disagree with that. However, plenty will take umbrage with those that take upon a mob mentality and act as they see fit.  

Additionally, the question of ‘where does it end’ needs to be settled.

Are monuments of our nation’s fathers now fair game?

Being upset does not make it ok to destroy things. Until those that destroy things can talk about the above question calmly, there will be no healing that they all claim to want so desperately.  

Learn more about the Abraham Lincoln statue’s destruction below.

Source:
DNA Info   

 

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