Basketball Coach Experiences Job Discrimination For Being An Ex-Gay Christian

There was a time when LGBT people were adamant about being protected from discrimination. That is what their movement was supposed to be about a few short decades ago. But now, suddenly, we find that their agenda is the status quo and that it is Christians who are being discriminated against.

We are familiar with bakers, photographers, and bed and breakfast facing discrimination for choosing to stick to their values in the way they do business.

But what has just happened to prospective basketball coach Camille LeNoir is something entirely new.

LeNoir is a former-WNBA player who had a successful career playing for the Washington Mystics. When her former college coach from her days on the basketball team of USC, Mark Trakh, called her up and offered her a job as assistant coach at New Mexico State.

However, LeNoir told the Washington Post, two days later, the offer was rescinded. Apparently, it was because of her sexuality. Her heterosexuality. 

The Daily Wire explains:

LeNoir identified as gay for most of her life, having begun dating women at age 16 and continuing to live a homosexual lifestyle until seven years ago, when, while playing overseas in Greece, she began spending more time reading the Bible and taking her Christian faith more seriously. In 2011, her last year playing in Greece, LeNoir agreed to give a Skype interview with a Christian organization in which she said that engaging in homosexual relationships is “not worth losing your soul” and that she believed others living that lifestyle could “overcome and defeat sin.”

“It was tough. I ended my last relationship [and] I was in love. There was nothing that went wrong in that relationship,” she said of the point at which she decided to stop engaging in homosexual relationships. “And so it was just a constant wrestling with what I know the Bible says, my family says and my emotions. And so I got to the point where, like, I’m choosing this over that.”

In the 2011 interview, LeNoir said that despite believing most of her life that she was gay, she no longer sees it that way. “If you believe something that you were born gay or homosexual or whatever — if you feel you were born that way — I would say that you weren’t,” she said. “God wouldn’t create you homosexual, then say in the Bible that it’s wrong, and then send you to hell. He doesn’t operate like that.” She encouraged those who struggle with their sexual identity to trust that God gives them the ability to “overcome it.”

According to LeNoir, Trakh called her up and explained that her public statement of faith and of denouncing homosexuality is what cost her the potential position:

Trakh retracted the job offer, LeNoir said, and advised her to remove the video if she ever wanted to work in college basketball. LeNoir said she was devastated. She felt she could be an effective coach regardless of what she’d said in that video. And besides, LeNoir figured, hadn’t she already accepted the position?

“I felt the job was taken away because of my heterosexuality,” LeNoir, 31, said in a recent interview.

She is now suing New Mexico State for discrimination on the basis of her sexual and religious identity. Daily Wire explains the situation:

While the university admits that Trakh did in fact rescind the job offer and that the video was the primary reason, it denies that any discrimination took place, arguing in court filings that her views on homosexuality “would have had an adverse impact” on her ability to coach and recruit LGBT players. The university also maintains that Trakh was not empowered to extend a formal offer.

Despite the university’s contentions, a federal judge has allowed the case to move forward, setting the stage for a significant legal battle involving religious freedom, sexual identity, and discrimination.

Let’s keep our eye on this case!

 

Join the conversation!

We have no tolerance for comments containing violence, racism, vulgarity, profanity, all caps, or discourteous behavior. Thank you for partnering with us to maintain a courteous and useful public environment where we can engage in reasonable discourse.