Colorado Man Scares Daylights Out Of City Council With Satanic Invocation

City council meetings are typically routine affairs, and you generally have a good idea of what you’re going to see. A bizarre man rambling through a satanic invocation is generally not on that list.

That’s exactly what happened at a recent meeting of the Grand Junction City Council in Colorado. Scott Iles, a member of the Western Colorado Atheists and Freethinkers, was randomly selected to lead the daily invocation – but he had a better idea.

Instead, he would call on his friend, Andrew Vodopich, to do the honors. As Christian News shares, “Vodopich, wearing a black shirt, red tie and what the Daily Sentinel described as a ‘serpent beard ring,’ read expressionless from a prepared statement.”

During his bizarre and frightening rant, Vodopich would say that “We beseech all those present to shun primitive hatreds and superstition, bigotry, prejudice and atavism,” and that “We counsel this entire community to allow the light of truth to shine unobstructed on all matters,” according to Christian News.

He would close things up by saying “in the name of reason, in the name of free inquiry and in the name of rebellion against theocracy.” Vodovich added in a “Hail, Satan” for good measure, Christian News reports.

As the bizarre scene was playing out, about 25 people gathered outside the building to recite the Lord’s Prayer. One organizer told reporters that they didn’t feel it was right to disrupt the proceedings inside.

“That’s not what we’re here for … We wanted to lift up the Lord’s name high and cast out what’s not for Him,” the organizer said, according to Christian News.

While we admire the efforts of those that gathered in prayer, “Satan worshippers” are a sad bunch, and we wish only for them to see the Light.

Source: Christian News

 

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