Cosmo Justifies Sibling Sexual Relationships (As If Cosmo Wasn’t Gross Enough Already)

The very same day that we receive word that the disgusting magazine Teen Vogue will no longer be circulated in print, we are reminded just how many disgusting magazines there are out there, right in plain view of children at the supermarket.

Cosmopolitian is one of these magazines, and while they are at the very least actually aimed at adult women instead of children, they make up for that in sheer profanity.

The magazine is normally known for their glossy spreads of various sex positions and terrible dating advice, but, more recently, they’ve delved into the realm of ridiculous, adult-themed leftist commentary and justification of perverted sexual relationships as author Brandon Morse of Red State explains:

“On top if its already increasing library of asine articles and idiotic subject matter, such as telling white children not to dress as Disney’s Moana, calling women’s orgasms sexist because men are gratified by them, and actual sadness that Texas women were having babies instead of abortions, Cosmo is now wanting you to believe incest is a-ok!”

That’s right–they’ve got a lengthy article about a long-lost brother and sister who fell in love, all written with glowing sympathy for the plight of the incestuous couple.

The article, titled “This Is What It’s Like to Fall in Love With Your Brother” has the telling subtitle, “Defying laws and societal taboos, one couple shares their undeniable connection,” and profiles a woman who, after finding out she had a brother as an adult was able to get in contact with him and meet him.

The siblings, both married, apparently were instantly attracted to each other and went to bed together after one drink.

The brother, Brian, left his wife shortly afterward but Melissa, the sister, still lives with her husband who is apparently OK with her ongoing sexual relationship with her own brother (?!).

The article explains that having a sexual attraction to a family member you meet for the first time as an adult is so common, that despite how depraved and ill-advised it is to succumb to this twisted temptation, there’s a name for it: “genetic sexual attraction.”

There must be some natural explanation for these feelings, Brian remembers thinking. And according to them, there is. The half-siblings say they are prime examples of genetic sexual attraction (GSA). The term was coined by Barbara Gonyo in the 1980s after she experienced an attraction to the adult son she had placed for adoption as an infant. (She later started a support group for other families.)

“The article interviews psychologist Debra Lieberman who says that it’s common for people who are related to one another to feel a sexual attraction after having not seen one another for a long period of time,” Morse explains. “According to Lieberman, we recognize each other’s similarities and are instantly attracted to the familiarity.”

But it’s been suggested that this feeling is even stronger for consanguineous (aka related) couples, especially those who don’t develop the ick factor from growing up together. Why? “Genes tend to shape our preferences, talents, and attitudes — and familiarity creates comfort, so we look for someone similar,” Lieberman says. “For siblings, this drives an enhanced sexual attraction.” Which is exactly what happened to Melissa and Brian.

The article makes no effort to denounce the relationship as immoral or irresponsible, and simply profiles the couple’s attraction to one another, explaining it in the psychological terms.

This is the very definition of “normalizing.”

This is where the slippery slope conservatives have been warning about is headed! First homosexuality, then incest, pedophilia or bestiality.

One can only imagine what will come next.

 

 

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