Hurricane Irma Is So Powerful It’s Triggering Earthquake Sensors

Featured image via National Hurricane Center

Hurricane Irma has grown so intense that it’s begun to trigger earthquake sensors, according to the National Oceanography Centre in the UK’s Southampton.

The Independent quotes Stephen Hicks, a seismologist with the organization, as stating via Twitter that “seismometer recordings from the past 48 hours on Guadeloupe [an island in the southern Caribbean Sea] show Cat. 5 Hurricane Irma driving closer toward the Lesser Antilles.”

As if that doesn’t drive home the ferocity of Hurricane Irma enough, The Guardian reports that experts are also referring to it as the most powerful hurricane ever recorded in the Atlantic Ocean.

According to The Guardian, Hurricane Irma has made landfall on islands in the north-east Caribbean, ripping the roofs off structures in Barbuda and causing major flooding on islands like Saint Barthélemy and Saint Martin.

See footage of the hurricane’s devastation in Barbuda and Saint Barthélemy below.

According to CNN, Hurricane Irma is heading towards Puerto Rico with winds upwards of 180 mph.

The storm could reach that island Wednesday afternoon or later in the evening.

While it’s unclear whether or not Hurricane Irma will make landfall on the U.S mainland, CNN reports that it could touch Florida, where a state of emergency has already been declared, this weekend.

The Telegraph reports that in the Florida Keys, officials have already ordered evacuations, which are immediately mandatory for visitors and must be followed by residents tomorrow.

Learn more about the warnings in Florida below.

You can track Hurricane Irma here.

Please continue to keep those in Hurricane Irma’s path in your prayers.

Sources:
The Independent
The Guardian
CNN
The Telegraph

 

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