Madonna Has Finally Made Good On Her Promise To Move Out Of The United States

Madonna, the pop star who once admitted to having contemplated blowing up the White House, has finally made good on her promise to move out of the United States.

Madonna now resides in Portugal – upwards of 4,500 miles from the country she has grown to hate so much in the past few months.

“I used to be a basket case but now I live in Libson,” Madonna – previously of New York – said in an Instagram post yesterday.

I used to be a basket case but now I Live in Lisbon! 🇵🇹♥️💯🎼🐎🍷💃🏻😂 👜!

A post shared by Madonna (@madonna) on

According to The Associated Press, Madonna fell in love with Portugal in 2004 after ending a tour there.

For whatever reason, Madonna hung around in the United States for several years after that, causing a ruckus on many an occasion, perhaps most prominently during the Women’s March earlier this year, when she lashed out at Republicans for being misogynistic and made her looney “I’d like to blow up the executive residence” remark.

Warning: Clip contains strong language and whiny feminist rambling.

News of Madonna’s move to Portugal appears to be sitting well with many people.

Madonna is one of the few celebrities that have made good on promises to kiss America goodbye following the 2016 election.

Those who remain include:

  • Leftist “comedian” (in the loosest use of the term possible) Chelsea Handler
  • Pro-abortion dog abuse hoaxer Lena Dunham
  • Tax evader and proud race-baiter Al Sharpton
  • Amber Rose, a woman who has about as much moral high ground as Madonna
  • Annoying talk show host Whoopi Goldberg
  • General all-around deviant Miley Cyrus

Check out The Activist Mommy’s roast of Madonna – and the Women’s March organizers in general – below.

Source:
The Associated Press

 

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