Newsweek Labels This Christian Family Organization a “Hate Group”

If you are paying attention, you probably don’t need to be warned to take everything you read and hear in the mainstream media with a grain of salt. Still, it is incredibly important to keep in mind how casually they use certain terms, especially when it comes to the term “hate group.”

While the mainstream media is certainly responsible for their casual and careless use of this word, and they almost certainly know exactly what they’re doing, they can definitely share the blame with the infamous Southern Poverty Law Center.

If you’re not familiar with SPLC, you should be. They are a legal non-profit that was formed during the civil rights movement to help impoverished African Americans fight the discriminatory laws of the Jim Crow South. Sounds perfectly noble, doesn’t it? It was, for sure, but they’ve taken a massive left turn since then. And when I say left, I mean far left.

They have been famous for compiling their lists of “hate groups” and “hate speakers” which law enforcement agencies and journalists alike have used for reference for decades.

However, over time, it became apparent that their definition of “hate” is incredibly broad, and while they classify legitimately hateful groups like white supremacists on their lists, they also list churches and Christian speakers as “hate groups” and “hate speakers” as well. They do, quite literally, put David Duke on the same list as Dr. Ben Carson.

The FBI stopped using their hate group lists several years ago because of the incredibly biased slant they have, and yet, the left-wing media continues to use it.

That is the case with Newsweek magazine, which recently referred to the conservative organization Family Research Council as a “hate group,” in the context of their article “Donald Trump To Speak At Hate Group’s Annual Event, A First For A President.”

There was not one iota of irony between their tired old refrain that Donald Trump is a racist/sexist/homophobe or that they referred to one of the most reputable and distinguished conservative organizations in the country a “hate group.”

So, what do they consider so hateful about the Family Research Council, anyway? Oh, that’s right. Their simple belief in Biblical morality. Not because they believe in stoning homosexuals or throwing them off buildings, but simply maintain that homosexuality is immoral.

“The group organizing the summit has previously commented on homosexuality,” Newsweek writes. “‘Family Research Council believes that homosexual conduct is harmful to the persons who engage in it and to society at large, and can never be affirmed. It is by definition unnatural, and as such is associated with negative physical and psychological health effects.’”

Trump’s decision to speak to the FRC, is, of course, undeniable proof that he is literally Hitler, as far as Newsweek is concerned.

“The anti-LGBTQ Family Research Council, labeled as a hate group by the SPLC,” (ah, there it is) “has hosted its annual summit since its inception in 2006. … No other sitting president has ever taken the decision to address the summit, although Trump has spoken before the conference on three previous occasions—even during his presidential election campaign.”

It probably doesn’t matter at all that the SPLC has been largely discredited and is hardly a reliable source for Newsweek to use. They fit the agenda. As the Daily Wire says:

“Yet even with plenteous evidence that the SPLC is a radically Left and incredibly biased source, Newsweek has the gall to cite it as a bastion of morality while condemning the Biblical perspective as emblematic of ‘hate.'”

Newsweek can be so bold because they know their audience probably won’t even care–the world is very happy to consider Christians ‘hateful’–but the truth is, that they’re the ones who hate.

 

 

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