Optometrist Shares Important Advice For Parents Ahead Of Tomorrow’s Solar Eclipse

While tomorrow’s total solar eclipse will undoubtedly make for excellent viewing, a Columbus, Ohio optometrist has issued a warning for all those who intend to see it.

“As an Optometrist , I want to express concern that I have about the solar eclipse on Monday, Aug 21,” he writes on Facebook. “There are serious risks associated with viewing a solar eclipse directly, even when using solar filter glasses. Everyone should keep in mind if they or their children are considering this.”

“We have to keep in mind that some people will encounter the inability to control every aspect of this exercise. For instance, many solar eclipse glasses are made for adults, do not fit children well and should not be used without direct parental supervision,” he continues.

“If the solar glasses do not filter out 100% of the harmful UV rays, if they are not used absolutely perfectly, or should there be a manufacturing defect in any of them, this will result in permanent and irreversible vision loss for any eye exposed.”

Schecter goes on to state that – just like with sunburnt skin – the effects of sun-damaged eyes may not be felt right away.

“I have a great fear that I will have patients in my office on Tuesday, August 22 who woke up with hazy, blurry vision that I cannot fix,” he continues.

Schecter further warns parents that while visual protection may help while viewing the solar eclipse, children may not follow proper procedure.

“Kids could have a tendency to want to peak around the filter to see what is actually going on up there,” he writes. “One failure, just one, where education and supervision fail, will have such a devastating consequence.”

“Please, please be safe, or watch it on television if you do not have proper protection,” he concludes.

In the comments of his post, Michael Schecter approves of a simple method to viewing the solar eclipse – creating a projector.

This will allow you and your children to view the eclipse without staring directly at the sun.

Check out the quick video below to learn how to make a safe projector.

If you’re not convinced this precaution to keep your vision safe, just take a look at this insane video showing how incredibly powerful the sun is.

Take a moment to thank Michael Schecter for his advice by visiting his post here!

 

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