Parents Of “Transgender” First-Grader Are Pushing For Policy Changes

The debate over transgender rights has taken on many different forms through the years. As always, those that see the world differently and raise questions as situations arise are scorned beyond belief.  

How are we all supposed to know what’s considered right and wrong when the rules on what’s acceptable change so whimsically?

As frustrating as that may be, that’s all fine, well, and good when we’re talking about adults engaged in debate. However, the same doesn’t apply when we’re talking about first-grade students.

The parents of a first-grade “transgender” student are pushing for changes in Asheville, North Carolina. Supporters showed up at  Buncombe County School Board meeting as well.

As the Citizen-Times reports, there were calls “for a system-wide policy that would extend anti-discrimination protections to transgender students.”

The board is resisting those calls, but you can be sure this matter won’t be going away quietly.

As Keep NC Safe notes on Facebook, this “is the perfect example of why it is so critically important for parents to remain vigilant and stay active at their children’s schools.”

The student in question is recognized as a boy named Colton on his birth certificate, but the parents informed the district that their son is now “transgender” and identifies as Emma. 

The Citizen-Times adds that the student “had to switch classrooms a few months into the school year because her first kindergarten teacher refused to use her female name or female pronouns.”

As always, stay very aware of what’s going on in your child’s school. While the board is resisting the call for changes to this policy, you never know when they’ll give in and implement things that go completely against your own beliefs.

Source: Citizen-Times

 

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